Optical Illusions and tricks II
 
(More goodies to mess with your eyeballs)

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     Welcome to More Optical Illusions II, the continuation of the original Optical Illusions.   In order to keep access time to a minimum, i only put 15 items on a page, so this section on optical illusions may end up with several pages before i have run out of material and finished it.  s Have fun,
JP

 

 

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Is it taller than it is across the brim ?
(you may be fooled)

     This is another fooler that relies on your lazy eyes. Eyes take more effort sweeping in a vertical direction than they do in a horizontal one and this extra effort causes you to think things are taller in proportion to their width than they really are.
     In this case, the brim of the hat is just as long as the hat is tall. They are both the same.

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Which ball is the biggest ?
(Which group has the largest ball?)

     Looking at the two red balls in this illustration, it appears as though the one that is surrounded by smaller white globes is larger than the one which is surrounded by larger ones.  In reality they are both the same size but the surrounding globes confuse the eye into thinking that they are of different diameter.

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How straight are the sides?
(they look curved to me)

   Even though the sides of this square are straight the rings that lie under them make the sides of the figure look like they are bending inward slightly. You can see they are straight by placing the edge of a piece of paper along the sides.  
   If the underlying figure were a burst of radial lines emanating from the center then the sides would appear to bulge outward instead of inward. Remove the circles completely and the lines all appear straight again.

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Clever Builders Those Romans
(They just don't build arches like this any more today)

 

    Here is a really nice version of a classic impossible geometry construction. As long as you look at the top only, or the bottom only, then you have no problems, but when you let your eyes sweep up or down it gets confusing and the reality of the shot disappears.

 

 

 


Pyramid Center Ball
(one ball is in the middle of the Pyramid)

     The pyramid is a good example of the way lines can lead your eye in the wrong direction and ruin your spatial judgment.   Take a look at the pyramid at left and select the red ball that is in the "middle" of the pyramid. Only one of the balls lies on the exact middle of the structure and the other two are either too high or too low.   Would you believe that the only ball to rest on the middle of the Pyramid it the top one?
It alone lies halfway between the base and the peak of the structure. The sloping slides and the tapering lines of the pyramid edges make it appear much too high.

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Light Source Illusions
(we assume the light comes from above)

     The figure at left appears to be riddled with golf-ball like dimples because we always assume the light is coming from above and not bellow. Even if we try to envision the light source coming from the bottom of this illusion, it is extremely difficult to make the dimples appear as bumps instead of depressions.   However if i simply rotate the figure, with out doing anything else to it, you will see a big difference as illustrated in the next figure, below.
     Oh boy, what a difference we have made by simply turning the picture upside down.   Again, we still are tied to the idea the the light is coming from above and we now see bumps where we used to see dimples.  Try as we may, it is really tough to make the light appear to come from below and turn these bumps into dimples, as they appear in the top photo.   What would happen if we only turned it sideways?
     This one can really start messing with your eyes.   Assuming the light is coming from above, once more, we can make this figure "flip" between dimples and bumps, depending on how we concentrate upon the picture and envision the light source.  If we can make ourselves think the light is coming from the left, then we will see bumps on the picture, but is we can make ourselves believe the light is coming from the right, then we will see dimples instead of bumps.

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After Image Illusions
(By itself, it is not recognizable)

     Looking at the figure to the left, you may be wondering, "What the heck is it?"   It is most difficult to make sense of the picture as it appears now, however if you stare intently, without moving your eyes from the four dots in the center for 60 seconds, and then look away a blank white wall or piece of white paper you will immediately recognize the image the your eyes tell you is there, but doesn't really exist at all.   (Blinking your eyes will strengthen the image)

     After images work on the fatigue your eyes experience when staring at the same spot for a long time without moving them. The areas of the retina that are fatigued from the image are not as capable of reading those colors as the rest of the eye's imaging area so they show you a "negative" image.

 

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Shimmering Rings
(false movement and depth perception)

     Although the figure at left is completely two dimensional, flat and stationary, it appears to shimmer and change as you stare at it. You will perceive raised circular mounds and valleys that reverse direction and shimmer as you gaze.   With a little effort you can change the hills to valleys at will while staring at them..

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Hand Art Camouflage
(these are photo-graphics, not drawings)

   These photos must have taken a long time to prepare. The figures are painted on actual human hands with a high degree of realism and skill that is astounding. Imagine how difficult it must have been to draw on a three dimensional hand and make it look like a flat painting, both for the artist and the model.
     As amazing as the Leopard and the dog are, in the above photos, the eagle below is absolutely awesome both in the art and the posing.   The camouflage is so effective that the blending of the hands and art make the hands disappear altogether. One is hard pressed to trace the line where the top hand overlaps the bottom hand, the artwork is so fantastically blended between the hands it is mind boggling.

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High Contrast Camouflage
(no shades of gray)

     Converting all the shades of gray in the photograph to either black or white, depending on their hue results in an extreme contrast picture as shown at left.   The photo looks like a bunch of black top showing though the snow to me at first glance.   Squint while looking at the upper middle of the picture and see who's image appears from all those black splotches.

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Who says spelling counts?
(Read the following and see...)

     If you are troubled by bad spelling, the folks at Cambridge have discovered something that may ease your mind. Spelling doesn't really count for much when we read. The human brain does not read each letter, but the appearance of the word only and if the first and last letters are in their proper place, it doesn't really matter what the rest of the letters are doing or in what order they happen to be arranged. To prove this theory, read the text you see below.

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